Nineteen years ago, 2,753 people were killed when hijacked planes were intentionally crashed into the north and south towers, or as a result of the crashes. We cried. We got angry. And the world changed.
 
In the past three days, 3,363 people have died in the US from COVID-19 — more than those who died at the hand of those terrorists. Where are the tears now? Where is the anger? The world has changed, but we aren’t doing much to stop the deaths.

There have been so many deaths. Have we become immune to feeling sorrow for these people? PEOPLE! They aren’t just statistics on a spreadsheet … they are someone’s husband or wife, mother or father, sister or brother, son or daughter, friend or neighbor.

 
As we remember those who died in the hands of terrorists two decades ago, let us also remember those who have died needlessly in recent days and weeks. And, perhaps, even more, let us remember the loved ones who were left behind.
 
May they all rest — or live — in peace.

My friend, Jacqueline Muollo, wrote the following, which made me cry. I hope it moves you, too.

Tomorrow is 9/11. I want to mourn the 191,567 deaths from Covid-19 in the U.S.

There are no memorials to those who died from Covid-19. There are no flags half staff. There are no lists of the mothers, fathers, aunts, sisters, brothers, children, and friends who died. There is no marble wall with their names inscribed. There are many funerals where no one came. There are dead people who were placed in “refrigerator trucks” and shipped to graves with no name. There were some precious people who were put in a spare room of a nursing home wrapped in blankets with the intent of hiding the dead.

There is still no national “wear a mask” mandate. There is still a political aspect to these deaths where many people call this a hoax. There are many Christians who are still attending church, singing and refusing to wear a mask. There are many who refuse to accept this virus as an indiscriminate germ that can infect anyone it can find.

I am ashamed of my fellow Americans who do not wear a mask everywhere. I am ashamed of my brothers and sisters who call themselves “Christian” but will not wear a mask at church. I am ashamed of my President and Congressional members and local authorities who are not enforcing wearing a mask and social distancing. This is the saddest time in American History. This is a time when the death of an elderly person is considered “par for the course” or a death that was inevitable, so why worry about a virus that kills. Shame on all of us. Shame! Shame! Shame!

#MaskUpNH